This Week's Show •

Breaking the Fever

With Ophelia Dahl just back from Liberia and Sierra Leone and Jeffrey Sachs, the economist and poverty guru, we’re reckoning with Ebola, still the world's biggest story. We're looking for long-term cures that will outlast this feverish moment in American media.

This Week's Show • October 16, 2014

Is Capitalism Working?

Casey Stengel raised the question about baseball’s miserable Mets long ago: anybody here know how to play this game? It’s the question more and more of us ask about economists and some of them ask about one another.

By the Way • October 9, 2014

Risa Puno: “Please Enable Cookies”

Last weekend, in one of Brooklyn’s hippest neighborhoods, DUMBO, interactive installation artist Risa Puno sold cookies at an unusual cost: your personal data. Want a homemade Pink Peppercorn Pistachio cookie? Try giving up your home address and driver’s license number. Would you like a Peanut-Butter Coconut Curry or Chocolate Chili Fleur de ...

October 9, 2014

Big Data: Who Are We On The Web?

On a corporatized Web, we’re often the sum of our all data — packaged and sold to data brokers for pennies. But the dream of the Internet was that we would be the producers, not the product: participants in a conversation outside of the force of gravity of moneyed media.

By the Way • October 6, 2014

Sounding the Sea

Composers of classical music often put performance directions or notes throughout their scores. John Luther Adams, a composer known for expansive, landscape-themed music, includes only one word on the score of Become Ocean, a 42-minute piece for symphony orchestra and the largest orchestral work Adams ...

By the Way • October 5, 2014

Report: The People’s Climate March

The march announced itself by force of numbers, and by its feel. No one seemed angry. This is not to say that the marchers had been bought off, or didn't understand the long odds facing them, or even that they aren't angry. But they are taking a clever rhetorical detour around a problem.

Podcast • October 5, 2014

Give Peace a Chance

In the late-night impromptu dialogs, the play of character, mood and role reversals, in the petty bickering and grand stakes -- it’s small wonder that Wright wrote this story first as a stage play. He is re-hatching the only (and unviolated) peace treaty between Israelis and Arabs, “one of the great diplomatic triumphs of the twentieth century.”

Podcast • October 4, 2014

Jeremy Grantham: In a Climate of Risk

Jeremy Grantham is a Boston financier who has found himself in the thick of the fight over climate change for more than twenty years. He’s the founder and chief strategist of Grantham Mayo van Otterloo, or GMO, which manages $112 billion in assets. When we spoke to him in ...

September 30, 2014

Hacking Climate Change

Can we hack our way toward solutions for climate change? While governments dither, Congress negates and the world warms, how about deploying private finance, atmospheric chemistry and every kind of ingenuity to tackle the problem that’s too big to solve?

By the Way • September 28, 2014

James vs. Roosevelt: Letters to the Crimson

Jackson Lears has dramatized the relationship between Theodore Roosevelt and William James, but evidence of that conversation is actually hard to find. We turned up one interesting chapter in the conversation turning around the Venezuelan Crisis of 1895, and playing out in the pages of the Harvard Crimson.