Activism in Memory of Aaron Swartz

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Aaron Swartz, before he became the first saint of the Internet age, seemed the perfect boy-child of the Internet, the algorithm made flesh, a human embodiment of the Internet’s voraciousness and connectivity, its head-spinning drive toward an open banquet of knowledge. The inventor of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee, pictured Aaron Swartz “blazing across the dark sky of ordinary people, broken systems, a shining force for good.” And then in Aaron Swartz’s death by suicide, at age 26, one year ago, it seemed a promise had been crushed — the machinery of surveillance, censorship, and control had won the day. A year later the invitation is to see deeper into a vision of technology but also of culture and humanity, and to recover something of Aaron Swartz’s ambition, as he put it shyly, “to save the world.”

Lawrence Lessig, the Harvard law professor and for a decade Aaron Swartz’s closest grown-up friend, leads us this hour from the cold, snowy trek he calls the the New Hampshire Rebellion. It’s a mission to save a corrupted Republic, to ransom the Congress of the United States, to smash the money shackles on our politics. It is part of the project to renew Swartz’s spirit. Lessig may be the preeminent legal advocate before the Supreme Court and elsewhere of the free Internet – free as in freedom, not as in ‘free lunch’, as the saying goes. He is the author of Republic Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress and a Plan to Stop It.

We’re trying also to locate Aaron Swartz as a landmark in the culture and the age. Matt Stoller, an incisive, sometimes scathing blogger on politics and money, was Swartz’s close friend and contemporary inside politics. The author Maria Bustillos corresponded with Aaron Swartz and has written wonderfully on his literary appetite and his own writing. He’d commented after his arrest two years ago that he read Kafka differently: The Trial, he realized, was not fiction but meticulous documentary coverage. And finally: nothing engages me more about Aaron Swartz than the news (to me, anyway) that he was an astute reader and commentator on David Foster Wallace and his mad epic Infinite Jest. On his blog Swartz had “solved” the mysterious ending of Wallace’s novel. It is as if he were trying to deduce the algorithm in Wallace’s head that produced the book. I am feeling tremors of a convergence here of iconic figures — two geniuses, two suicides and perhaps two parallel visions of an American apocalypse.

A reading list, for those interested.

A year ago Professor Lessig gave a TED talk about campaign finance reform, and how he sees the issue:

[ted id=1702]

 

Guest List
Lawrence Lessig
Lawrence Lessig, the Harvard law professor and for a decade Aaron Swartz's closest grown-up friend. Lessig may be the preeminent legal advocate before the Supreme Court and elsewhere of the free Internet – free as in freedom, not as in 'free lunch', as the saying goes. He is the author of Republic Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress and a Plan to Stop It.
Matt Stoller
Matt Stoller, an incisive, sometimes scathing blogger on politics and money, was Swartz's close friend and contemporary inside politic
Maria Bustillos
The author Maria Bustillos corresponded with Aaron Swartz and has written wonderfully on his literary appetite and his own writing. He'd commented after his arrest two years ago that he read Kafka differently: The Trial, he realized, was not fiction but meticulous documentary coverage
Reading List
From Swartz's blog: Everything is Bad For You, A Non-Programmer's Apology, On Finishing Infinite Jest and What Happens at the End of Infinite Jest
Aaron Swartz
From Swartz's blog, Everything Good is Bad For You and A Non-Programmer's Apology. And thoughtful writing on David Foster Wallace, Swartz's favorite writer (and the figure at the center of next week's show!): On Finishing Infinite Jest and What Happens at the End of Infinite Jest.
Requiem for a Dream
Larissa McFarquahar
Requiem for a Dream, Larissa McFarquahar's posthumous profile of Swartz in The New Yorker.
The Idealist
Justin Peter
Justin Peters, The Idealist, on Slate.
The Life and the AfterLife of Aaron Swartz
Wesley Yang
Wesley Yang, The Life and Afterlife of Aaron SwartzNew York.

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