April 27, 2016

Eileen Myles’s Moment

This week, we’re tuning into the writer Eileen Myles. Born outside Boston in 1949, Myles is just now having an all-American moment. Myles has spent the last forty years...| More
February 12, 2013

Geoff Dyer, “on whom nothing is lost…”

Geoff Dyer would tell you he found his way into writing as a way of not having a career. With ever-ready tennis racquet in his...| More
November 27, 2012

Tuesday in Tahrir: Field Notes, with Novelists

 CAIRO — On the way into the tumult in Tahrir Square today, we’re in conversation with the novelist Mona Prince of So You May See...| More
July 5, 2011

Harold Bloom: On the Playing Field of...

Harold Bloom, in conversation about his famous Anxiety of Influence, slips so comfortably into baseball and jazz metaphors (“tropes,” in the lingo) that I’m wondering...| More
May 12, 2011

Anna West: Poetry That’s “Louder than a...

Click here to listen to Chris’ conversation with Anna WestAnna West, poet and teacher, is letting us in on “Louder than a Bomb.” Before it...| More
May 10, 2011

Whose Words… (36) Alex Charalambides: “Look at...

Click here to listen to Chris’ conversation with Alex Charalambides Alex Charalambides, a slam star at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in Salem next weekend, is...| More
May 5, 2011

Whose Words These Are: January O’Neil’s Underlife

Click here to listen to Chris’ conversation with January Gill O’Neil January Gill O’Neil personifies the very broad reach of the third Massachusetts Poetry Festival,...| More
March 17, 2011

C. D. Wright in Triumph: One With...

[newyorker.com image]C. D. Wright is well known for assembling her patchwork poetry from local and vernacular fragments. Even with fame and standing, she has still...| More
January 27, 2011

Whose Words These Are: Christian Wiman’s “Wound...

Click to listen to Chris’ conversation with Christian Wiman. (41 minutes, 20 mb mp3)Christian Wiman didn’t plan it this way but his poetry is now...| More
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What in James Joyce's Ulysses was so dangerously obscene? And why were the novel's greatest champions women? | Hear More
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